REAP

Recovery Eco Agriculture Project

Recovery Eco Agriculture Project

Recovery Eco Agriculture Project is an educational non profit 501c3 based in Georgia, and run from Tierra Sonrisa Garden in Palmetto, Georgia. We are involved in education, research, and development of sustainable and regenerative land use. We work in organic horticulture, small scale farming, agro-forestry, and reforestation. REAP has worked in various parts of the US, South East Asia, Central and South America.

REAP's Purpose and Goals

REAP works in sustainable and regenerative land use. We provide education, research and development in the areas of small scale farming, agroforestry and reforestation. We promote land stewardship skills through teaching Agroecology and horticultural Biodynamic methods. We also work in horticultural therapy by providing barrier free gardens for physically and developmentally disabled populations. We promote seed saving by distributing heirloom seeds and helping set up seed banks. Our children's program has established edible playground gardens that uses play structures as trellises. We work in agroforestry with mixed use crops that provide food and habitat.

In early 2020 we conducted a tree planting program in communities throughout Georgia and planted 20,000 native trees across the state to teach and demonstrate land regeneration. REAP provides education and extension through seminars, workshops and development in various parts of the US and around the world. Our demonstration research facility is Tierra Sonrisa located in Palmetto, Georgia. REAP is involved in education, research and development of the three Rs; Land Regeneneration, Restoration, and Remediation.

Tierra Sonrisa Garden has been our home as well as our demonstration garden and educational, research center since 2010. Contact us for more information.

Reforestation in Georgia

In early 2020 we coordinated the planting of 20,000 native trees throughout Georgia. The idea was to demonstrate how to regenerate land and reclaim habitat. We planted trees from Brunswick to Blueridge and from Columbus to Lake Hiawassee, in secure locations where they can grow for many years. We worked with a variety of groups: city governments, environmental non profits, some churches, watershed management, DNR, Cooperative extension UGA, schools, and many of the colleges in Georgia participated.

The concept of offering people a way to make a positive impact on their community and connect with a piece of land is very powerful. Based on the feedback and pictures we received, along with all the rain during the spring, most of the trees did well and leafed out during the spring and summer. The trees were seedlings ranging from one to six feet tall. These were trees for the future.

When we originally did this thirty years ago. I worked with many schools around Atlanta. At that time I would tell the fourth and fifth graders that they could come back in thirty years with their children and tell them that they planted that tree when it was a small seedling. I know where some of those trees are now and they are thirty feet tall. It was not a tree program as much as it was a people campaign. If we are to reclaim the earth as a healthy place to live it will have to involve people.

We are the caretakers. We destroy the environment and we need to learn how to heal it. There is a great need for good land stewards of our planet.

We hope to do more tree plantings and are looking at other countries that might work, and also considering fruits that can be grown. This of course would involve a commitment of caring for the trees that might feed a community.